How well do you know the rugby rules ?

What is the key difference between football and rugby? What is a try? a drop kick? a tackle?

Find out more about the rules of rugby in the fifth episode of "Do you speak rugby?"

"Rugby is a hooligan's game played by gentlemen, and football is a gentleman's game played by hooligans." We suspect the author of this old British adage favoured the oval ball over the round one— and that is the biggest difference between the two sports. This sport allows you to hold the ball tight to minimise the risk of losing it. Because in rugby, the 15 (not 11) players can touch the ball with their hands. Not so in football, where only the goalkeeper is allowed to use their hands.

Is the old English adage true? In that case, a gentleman is required to make his opponent's job easier. To gain five points in rugby, you must score a try, which consists of grounding the ball in the opposing team's in-goal. This area is much larger than football goals. This means fair play, right? If ever the defenders are lacking, an attacking player—generally a skilled kicker playing scrum-half—may attempt a drop-kick. He must kick the ball immediately after it bounces and put it through the uprights to score three points. Defenders are tasked with preventing this, by tackling, for example: tackling consists of taking hold of an opponent between the ankles and waist in order to bring him down to the ground and force them to release the ball. In the event of a foul tackle—a hold at the shoulder or neck level, for example—the referee calls a penalty. If converted, a penalty kick is worth three points.

Is the old English adage true? In that case, a gentleman is required to make his opponent's job easier. To gain five points in rugby, you must score a try, which consists of grounding the ball in the opposing team's in-goal. This area is much larger than football goals. This means fair play, right? If ever the defenders are lacking, an attacking player—generally a skilled kicker playing scrum-half—may attempt a drop-kick. He must kick the ball immediately after it bounces and put it through the uprights to score three points. Defenders are tasked with preventing this, by tackling, for example: tackling consists of taking hold of an opponent between the ankles and waist in order to bring him down to the ground and force them to release the ball. In the event of a foul tackle—a hold at the shoulder or neck level, for example—the referee calls a penalty. If converted, a penalty kick is worth three points.

Sometimes, it is the tackles that make some matches more memorable than others. In the France-Wales semi-final of the 2011 World Cup, we all remember the brutal tip tackle on Vincent Clerc by Welshman Sam Warburton, who was sent off after the incident. It takes only a single move to turn a match around, a mistake or a missed conversion. During the 2011 France-New Zealand final, François Trinh-Duc's foot was steady when he converted the try by Dusautoir. The same cannot be said for Toulouse player Luke McAlister, against Clermont, on 6 June 2015, in their Top 14 semi-final. Two points were given up at a crucial moment, and Clermont ended up winning.

How well do you know the rugby positions?

What is a prop? A winger? A scrum-half?... Find the answers below with our fourth episode of "Do you speak rugby?"

Watch the video

How well do you know the rugby expressions?

What's the "third-half"? What does a hospital pass mean?... Discover what rugby culture is with this third episode of "Do you speak rugby?"

Watch the video

How well do you know the Rugby World Cup venues?

The host country, the origins of rugby and the stadiums of the next Rugby World Cup... Find out the all the answers in this second episode of "Do you speak rugby?"

Watch the video

How well do you know the Rugby World Cup?

Dates and key figures, participating countries, previous winners... Test your knowledge and get ready for this major sporting event with the first episode of "Do you speak rugby?"

Watch the video